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"Oooo They Stealing": Did Fashion Nova Fuck Up?


We all fuck with the typical fashion nova fit because they make our booties pop out in those tight fitting jeans (no applebottom) and we can find a quick fit before popping out to the club. But is fashion nova acting a little shady? Word around town is Black instagrammer and entrepreneur Jai Nice took to instagram to rant to her 1.5 million followers about how Fashion Nova is beginning a long trend of stealing designs from independent black boutiques. In her post she wrote about how her hoodie design made in last October was purchased by Fashion Nova, replicated, and then returned.


Starting as a small online boutique, Fashion Nova has blew up to be one of the most influential clothing lines, partly because they made their business poppin from solely the platform of instagram. In the age of the internet, CEO Richard used the idea of bloggers and people looking for outfit inspo on instagram to share his brand. But is it true that CEO Richard Saghin is stealing from black designers to make a profit? According to buzzfeed news.com, “Fashion Nova's social media team monitors what’s being worn online, sending trending styles to a design team that can produce sample products in less than 24 hours.” Having a team of people constantly check for the latest fashion trends is probably how Fashion Nova comes across the designs from other designers, specifically black designers.

Lets be real for a second:this is just another case of the culture vulture, brands taking the idea and designs of black creators for their own personal profit. Fashion Nova continues to succeed because they prey on the idea that minority communities crave good quality high end fashion for less, and they deliver that promise.

Whereas a Jai Nice hoodie from her clothing brand Kloset Envy would sell for $70, Fashion Nova sells the same hoodie for $40. Dresses on Fashion Nova are between $20 to $40 and their signature high waisted booty popping jeans are a whopping $30-$40.

But is this the precedent that we want to set for upcoming black brands in the future? Are we willing to take prices over quality and uplifting one another? How can we exert and uplift the codes of Black excellence and support black businesses without hurting our wallets in the process?


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